Italy

Hotel Schgaguler

Hotel Schgaguler

South Tyrol, Italy

The chestnut (Castanea sativa, Mill. 1768) is a stately and long-lived tree. It has always been a symbol of generosity, since its fruits can feed the mountain people. At Schgaguler Hotel, the warm and solid walls of chestnut wood refresh your sight and touch. The perfect embrace of their natural tone strikes you immediately…

Malga Gostner

Malga Gostner

South Tyrol, Italy

Franz Muller’s cuisine tastes like malga, meadows and woods. Each ingredient is either fresh or matured here. “We’ve got everything we need,” he often says..

Sketch

Sketch

Lombardy, Italy

You may not know that the first successful hybrid by Nazareno Strimpelli was the Carlotta wheat, named after his wife and assistant Carlotta Parisani. Among the numerous Semente Elette (select seeds) that the revolutionary agronomist, politician and geneticist created, you can find specialities such as the famous Senatore Cappelli and the Ardito, a soft wheat rich in proteins and with little gluten…

L’Ambasciata

L’Ambasciata

Lombardy, Italy

If everyone has a gift, not all of us are free and fearless enough to foster it. Romano Tamani had both the liberty and the braveness to leave Quistello and go to work as a cook in London first, and then to come back to Quistello and create with his brother Carlo a cult place/temple of the Mantuan Gonzaga cuisine in the old family house…

La Clinica Gastronomica Arnaldo

La Clinica Gastronomica Arnaldo

Emilia Romagna, Italy

Saturday is market day in Rubiera. We cross the general gaiety that enlivens the routine of towns and neighbourhoods every week and go to Arnaldo’s for lunch. Therefore, we are in the right mood when we read the menu…

Paolo Atti e Figli

Paolo Atti e Figli

Emilia Romagna, Italy

Pushing the glass door of the shop at 7 Via Caprarie feels like turning the page of a tale that started in 1868. Back then, Paolo Atti came to town to work as a baker, still unconscious of the fate that would lead him to start the dynasty of Bolognese gastronomy that still boasts his name. On a Saturday morning, the phone keeps ringing…

Il Borgo del Balsamico

Il Borgo del Balsamico

Emilia Romagna, Italy

A late-October Sunday in the Reggio Emilia province, Italy, where genius and industries prosper. A gate opens slowly and reveals a place full of wonders: a noble late 18th century villa, an Italian garden and, not very far, a wood;  pointed windows, almost-ripe apples, and a box hedge; a century-old sequoia, a secluded swimming pool, late roses, and the path leading to the ice-house…

My springtime

My springtime

by Giorgia Eugenia Goggi

We admire Giorgia’s cooking skills and her being in-house chef at one of our favourite places, Masseria Moroseta. There is no menu, each dinner is unique and depends on her daily inspiration and on the vegetable garden’s yield…

SanBrite

SanBrite

Veneto, Italy

Pinecones and branches come from the wood, the vegetables from the home garden, cheese, butter and milk from the in-house dairy, and the fresh pasta from the family’s malga. SanBrite is, first of all, an act of love towards one’s own land and roots…

Niedermairhof

Niedermairhof

South Tyrol, Italy

It was probably on a Saturday afternoon, at the special time when the sun disappears behind a mountain. There were two rooms in our name at Niedermairhof. Helmut and Kathrin were in the courtyard, and he was sitting on the tractor holding their ecstatic son on his lap…

Taverna della Rocca

Taverna della Rocca

Marche, Italy

La Taverna della Rocca has the fragrance of my childhood Sundays: long tables and meals that resembled a ritual; the smell of dense meat sauce – cooked slowly – and of hand-rolled egg pasta that characterised the holiday; the smell of grilled meat. The only ‘eccentricity’ here are the piade sfogliate grilled and served with wild herbs and local toma cheese (the house women are quite proud of them). An ode to dedication and simplicity.

Masseria Tagliente

Masseria Tagliente

Puglia, Italy

If I had a masseria, I think I’d want it like this one: a luxury family residence with a big, spotless white, Spanish-style façade and five balconies on the piano nobile to see if the black wild horses are back from the woods, if the goats have gone into the shed, and if Brindisi and the Ionian Sea are glittering in the evening. The corner kitchen tiled with majolica ends in a big roof terrace, near St. Martin’s statue…

Masseria Schiuma

Masseria Schiuma

Puglia, Italy

‘Schiuma’ (foam) is a splendid word. It quickly calls to mind high waves’ foam, soft soap bubbles and their rainbows, soft milk, shaving foam that smells like pungent cologne, the lightness of childhood, an adolescence-like goliardic spirit, and an ephemeral consistency that leads you to play at any age. There is a street named Schiuma that from national road S90 – Monopoli to Savelletri – going south, takes you away from the sea and into an unexpected countryside. Masseria Schiuma’s name comes from it. In my opinion, its owners – a sincere Danish couple, graceful and beautiful, Pernille and Lars – love simplicity so much that they did not want to add any more frills or meanings to this place, a temple of private and shared spaces. Every movement of hosts and guests is free and mature…

Palazzo Penelope

Palazzo Penelope

Puglia, Italy

‘32 sq. m. of sea’. Water is the primary element that always fascinated Pino Pascali. The artist re-created his own sea in zinc tubs, each one containing a tone-on-tone variation of the colour of the sea. Pino Pascali, the greatest Apulian artist, was born in Bari on 19th October 1935. His parents came from Polignano a Mare. Very soon, his works emphasized his Mediterranean culture…

Sakeya

Sakeya

Milan, Italy

‘No moon, no blossom. Just me drinking sake, totally alone.’ Matsuo Bashō, 1689. Oku no Hosomichi (‘The Narrow Road to the Interior’) is one of the most important classic books of the Japanese literature. This work by poet Matsuo Bashō is a travelogue written both in prose and verses during a long and perilous walk, a five-month pilgrimage, more than two thousand kilometres long, from the modern Tokyo to the Japanese hinterland. It was the end of the eighteenth century. The master’s itinerary became the opportunity for many to start their own Japanese journey…

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